Articles from the November 15, 2017 edition


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  • Birth of the Chosen One

    Retold by Terry M.Wildman, Illustrated by Ramone Romero|Updated Nov 16, 2017

    Dream Guidance Bitter Tears had returned home to be with her family and to He Gives Sons, the man she was promised to in marriage. Before they came together he discovered that she was with child. Because he was a man of honor and did not want to disgrace her, he thought about secretly releasing her from the marriage promise. As he wondered about these things, a messenger from the Great Spirit appeared to him in a dream, and said, "He Gives Sons, son of Much Loved One, do not...

  • Cherokee National Youth Choir wins best pop recording at Native American music awards

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    TAHLEQUAH-The Cherokee National Youth Choir's album "Celebration" was named Best Pop Recording during the 17th annual Native American Music Awards held Saturday, Oct. 14. This year's award marks the fifth honor-referred to as a NAMMY- the Cherokee National Youth Choir has garnered since the choir's inception in 2000. The youth choir was also nominated for Group of the Year and Record of the Year for its latest album. "We were so excited to win Best Pop Recording at the Native...

  • Canoe carving teaches tribal traditions to youth

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    LAPWAI, IDAHO-How do you help children enjoy a sense of their heritage? Nez Perce Tribe member Julian Matthews thought that enlisting the kids' help in carving a traditional canoe might accomplish the purpose. Matthews and others first felled a thick fir in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness and hauled it down behind Nimiipuu Health. Matthews' friend, carpenter James Jameson, identified the heavy side of the 23-foot log by floating it in water, and then the two men and tribal...

  • Letters from Our Readers

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    Thank you for showing me who I was in the article "I Loved a Girl" from the July/August 2017 issue. It's just what I was. On line 15 it says, "'You shall not commit adultery,' does not apply in my case." Galatians 5:19 tells just how wrong as a young man I was. Matthew 5:28, "Jesus said that whosoever looketh on a woman to lust after her hath committed adultery with her already in his heart." I could go on and on, but I won't. This article touched my heart in a way no one...

  • People Give in Troubled Times

    Jeanette Littleton|Updated Nov 16, 2017

    "This is for you,” my co-worker said as he lifted the cork lid to the ceramic jar marked “Unsolicited Advice” that I keep filled with chocolate on top of my filing cabinet. He stuffed something in there and added. “My wife and I want to do this. It’s to help you through a hard time.” Then he dashed off before I could say anything. What was that all about? I wondered. I’d known Larry for many years and always felt I could be honest with him. So when he’d asked about my family, I’d told him This time two years ago, my hus...

  • In Faith I Asked

    Paul Mitchell|Updated Nov 16, 2017

    My life was a complete wreck. My career and my personal life were a mess. I was well on my way to dissolving any former impression of who I was before desire became habit açhabit evolved into alcohol addiction. At the time, some of the deep moorings within my heart and mind had given way. I had been divorced from my family for some time, and my career had just ended. However, the emotional tearing and ripping of my heart had failed to leave me for dead. I was hoping to scab ov...

  • Mi'kmaw artist wins Canada's Sobey Art Award

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    Ursula Johnson, a Nova Scotia artist, has won Canada's largest prize for contemporary art, the $50,000 Sobey Art Award. A Mi'kmaw performance and installation artist, Johnson incorporates her heritage into her art, which challenges and explores issues of identity, traditional Indigenous culture and colonial history. The award's selection committee praised her "strong voice, her generosity and collaborative spirit. Through her work, she redefines traditional materials and...

  • First Nation girl nominated for International Children's Peace Prize

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    A Wikwemikong First Nation girl from Manitoulin Island in Northern Ontario has been nominated for the International Children's Peace Prize. Thirteen-year-old Autumn Peltier is the only Canadian being considered for the prestigious award. The public eye is not new to this young teen, who has been speaking on her passion for the environment, especially Canada's water, for years. Her advocacy began when she entered a community writing contest with an essay on water at eight...

  • Bryan Rice named new Director of BIA

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    WASHINGTON-In October 2017, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke announced the selection of Bryan Rice, a veteran federal administrator and citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, as the new Director of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the federal agency that coordinates government-to-government relations with 567 federally recognized tribes in the United States. "Bryan has a wealth of management expertise and experience that will well serve Indian Country as the...

  • Cherokee Nation honors hundreds of Native-owned businesses

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    TULSA, Okla.­-The Cherokee Nation honored hundreds of Native-owned businesses, from construction companies to printing shops, during the tribe's 10th Annual TERO Certified Indian Owned Business Awards Banquet Thursday in November, 2017. The Cherokee Nation Tribal Employment Rights Office has more than 800 Indian-owned companies that are TERO-certified vendors able to do business with the tribe and better compete for government contracting jobs. In fiscal year 2017, TERO...

  • Thousands of elders gather in Edmonton

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    More than 5,000 elders of First Nations, Métis and Inuit descent gathered in Edmonton for the First National Gathering of Elders in September, 2017. The Northland's Expo Center in Edmonton is overflowing this week with Indigenous elders attending the first National Gathering of Elders. The purpose of the three-day event was "so the Elders can come together and take their rightful place as advisors, teachers and leaders," conference organizers wrote. Assembly of First Nations...

  • Alberta names first government building after indigenous woman

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    In a historic first, a provincial government building has been named for an Indigenous woman. In late October, during Women's History Month, the government announced the designation of the Edmonton facility, at 12360 142 Street, as the Muriel Stanley Venne Provincial Centre. Muriel Stanley Venne has been a leader in the First Nations and Métis communities of Alberta for more than 30 years and has advanced the fair treatment of Indigenous peoples within all levels of society....

  • Tribal Justice: Native Americans hope acknowledging the past will shape a better future

    Courtney Mally Cronkite News|Updated Nov 16, 2017

    PHOENIX-Law students, professors and tribal members gathered recently at the Sandra Day O'Connor School of Law in downtown Phoenix to watch the new documentary "Tribal Justice." The documentary features two chief judges from tribes in Arizona and California, and highlights some of the issues found on reservations, including lack of federal funding and guardianship appeals for families in Indian Country. Those behind the documentary said they hope the project helps shed a...

  • Indian Life columnist receives Lifetime Achievement Award

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    The Tomaquag Museum, Rhode Island's only museum dedicated to telling the story of the state's Indigenous Peoples, recently awarded Indian Life's Native Cooking columnist with their Lifetime Achievement Award. Dale Carson, of the Abenaki tribe, was born and raised near the water in Rhode Island. Both parents were artists so her home life was rich in books and artwork and Dale found her own niche in painting and doing crafts. She has had two retail shops featuring Native...

  • Canadian government settles lawsuit over children "scooped" out of indigenous communities

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    On October 6, 2017, The Canadian federal government agreed to pay C$750 million to the survivors of the "Sixties Scoop" program, in which 20,000 First Nations children were removed from their parents' households and placed with non-indigenous foster or adoptive parents. The plaintiffs claimed that this caused them mental and emotional anguish and loss of their ancestral culture. Carolyn Bennett, Canada's Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister, announced the agreement. "I have...

  • Controversies continue over Native American costumes

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    With racial issues taking more attention on the North American stage the past couple of years, controversy was rife in 2017 over the appropriateness, or inappropriateness, of Halloween and party costumes depicting Native Americans. Halloween has morphed into a day that "celebrates creative self-expression," said author Alla E. Dastagir in USA Today. And for many, especially people raised on Disney depictions of indigenous people, dressing as Pocahontas or other strong...

  • Village seal changed due to racist charges

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    Whitesboro, a village of about 3,700 in central New York's Oneida County, recently unveiled a new official seal in efforts to respond to a charge of racism. The previous seal depicting a wrestling match between the community's founder and an Oneida Indian chief endured national scrutiny as it was interpreted as a white man strangling a Native American. Prompted by an online campaign disparaging the original, three-fourths of those voting in 2016 were in favor of keeping the...

  • NCAI joins Assembly of First Nations in calling for a North America Free Trade Agreement Indigenous Chapter

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    MILWAUKEE, WI | On Tuesday, October 18, 2017, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) membership overwhelmingly moved to support Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde’s request that NCAI join AFN in working to establish an Indigenous Chapter in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). National Chief Bellegarde was addressing NCAI at the NCAI 74th Annual Convention and Marketplace in Milwaukee, WI. “I thank the National Congress of American Indians for passing a unanimous motion sup...

  • Navajo, other tribes call land-use bill a step in the right direction

    Isaac Windes Cronkite News|Updated Nov 16, 2017

    WASHINGTON-Tribal leaders backed a House bill on October 25, 2017, that would give tribes the ability to control more of their land, instead of having to get federal approval for virtually any use. The American Indian Empowerment Act would let tribes shift federally controlled trust land to "restricted fee land," a move that could save millions of dollars that tribes now spend on "burdensome regulation," while restoring a level of tribal sovereignty. While they called the...

  • Cities switch honor from Columbus to Indigenous Peoples

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    KANSAS CITY-On October 9, Kansas City, Mo., officially declared the day as Indigenous Peoples Day, joining a growing list of more than 50 U.S. cities shucking the celebrations of Christopher Columbus in favor of recognizing the indigenous people of North America. The city council adopted legislation to officially declare Oct. 9 as Indigenous Peoples Day in Kansas City, Mo. Resolution No. 170786 states, in part: Christopher Columbus, a man who is known to have "discovered" the...

  • American Indian children among those lagging behind.

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    BALTIMORE-According to an Annie E. Casey Foundation's 2017 Race for Results report, American Indian kids join children in immigrant, African-American, and Latino families as lacking in opportunities for success and well-being. Among the findings: • Thirty-eight percent of American Indian children live in households with incomes of 200 percent above the federal poverty level, compared to 69 percent of white children and 69 percent of Asian children. • Among fourth-graders natio...

  • Sex trafficking in Indian Country a "significant problem," senators told

    Adrienne St. Clair Cronkite News|Updated Nov 16, 2017

    WASHINGTON-Sex trafficking in Indian Country is a significant problem, with tribal women and children suffering at higher rates than the general population, a panel of experts and activists told a Senate committee on September 27, 2017. Witnesses told the Senate Indian Affairs Committee that tribes experience risk factors that can lead to victimization more often than other groups and that tribal women and children are targeted by traffickers "for their exotic beauty." "All...

  • Senators introduce resolution to honor Native American Heritage Month

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    WASHINGTON-Senators John Hoeven (R-ND) and Tom Udall (D-NM), chairman and vice chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs (SCIA), led a bipartisan group of 21 senators in introducing a resolution to recognize the month of November as National Native American Heritage Month. The resolution celebrates the heritage, culture and history of Native Americans and recognizes the many contributions Native Americans have made to our nation. "Native Americans have significantly...

  • Aboriginals in Canada increasing four times faster than population

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    According to Canada's 2016 Census, the indigenous population of the country is growing at four times the rate of the rest of the population. Nearly 1.7 million people identified as Aboriginal, which is a 4.9 percent share of the total population and a 42.5 percent increase since 2006, a growth rate more than four times that of their non-Indigenous counterparts. Statistics Canada says the spike is a result of natural growth-increased life expectancy and a high fertility...

  • Bear Ears Monument remains controversial

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    Bear Ears Monument in Utah remains in the middle of controversy. The state of Utah has submitted maps to the Interior Department that show Bear Ears National Monument cut in size from 1.35 million acres to approximately 120,000 acres. While the Trump administration has not announced a final decision on the state's vision, Utah Senator Orrin Hatch has issued a press release praising the administration's impending decree. Governor Gary Herbert's office argues that the state's pr...

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