Articles from the July 15, 2020 edition


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  • Make a List

    Crying Wind|Updated Aug 6, 2020

    I make a lot of lists to remind myself of things I need to do. I make grocery lists and more often than not I leave them on my kitchen table. I go to the store without them and forget to pick up a few things. Then I have to make a second trip later in the week to get salt or butter or onions that I forgot. When I get a new calendar I go through it month by month and circle the dates of the birthdays of my family and friends. They are important to me. My friends would survive...

  • Ramona Harjo (February 5, 1938–February 5, 2005) and Josh Harjo

    K.B. Schaller|Updated Aug 6, 2020

    It is always refreshing to see or hear of a husband and wife team, especially Native American, in faith-based, Christian ministry. Such is the case of Josh (full blood Creek) and Ramona Harjo (full blood Choctaw). Because the non-Indian majority in the United States tend to regard all Native Americans as Reservation-based, they also regard them as practicing their own spirituality and traditions that are contrary to Christianity. Native Americans, however, are everywhere,...

  • Native Cooking

    Dale Carson|Updated Aug 6, 2020

    Dear Friends and maybe a few relatives, this year is so different and not much fun being locked indoors since March in a self-quarantine. Hope things are easier for you. I'm sure we all love summer and summer foods so I think it might be good to share some ideas from my "neck of the woods'" to yours. Berries are "in" just about everywhere to make fruit salads sparkle. Blueberries, strawberries, pineapple, chunky watermelon make a delicious happy salad-a little on the sweet...

  • Film Review

    Will Krischke|Updated Aug 6, 2020

    He hath shown thee, O man, what is good: and what doth the Lord require of thee but to do justly and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God? -Micah 6:8 Just Mercy is based on the lives of two black men: Harvard-educated lawyer Bryan Stevenson (played by Michael B. Jordan), who started the non-profit Equal Justice Initiative. The organization was designed to provide free legal assistance to death row inmates, far too many of whom could not afford a lawyer to...

  • Canada's biggest Indigenous police force has impeccable record

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    TORONTO, Ont.-According to Canadian Press, in its 26 years of existence, officers with Canada's largest Indigenous police force have never shot and killed anyone, nor has any officer died in the line of duty. The Nishnawbe Aski Police Service (NAPS) is proud of this record. The key difference from urban, non-Indigenous policing, insiders and observers say, is the relationship building between officers and the people they serve. Part of the reason for developing those skills...

  • Nunavut harvesters receive nearly $15 million for food security

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    IQALUIT, Nunavut-The federal government is giving Inuit in Canada over half of a $40-million grant for harvesters, and Nunavut Inuit will see the bulk of those funds. To support food security through traditional harvesting, Inuit communities will get $28.5 million over the next five years through the federal Harvesters Support Grant. Of that, Nunavut Inuit are getting more than $14.8 million. The Harvesters Support Grant, which is only available to communities that rely on...

  • For now, no border wall will split Cocopah reservation along the Colorado River

    Alisa Reznick, Arizona Public Media|Updated Aug 6, 2020

    TUCSON-President Donald Trump's border wall now stretches along just more than 200 miles of U.S.-Mexico borderland. Progress hasn't slowed during the COVID-19 pandemic; in some places it's even accelerating. But there's a tiny swath of tribal land along the lower Colorado River where that's not the case. The Cocopah Reservation sits in the river's delta, a corner of the borderland where California, Arizona and Mexico meet. Members of the Cocopah Indian Tribe are among the 40...

  • Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe receives land victory

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    MASHPEE, Mass-On July 24, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 7608, a package of appropriations bills which also includes an amendment to protect the land of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe. The language of the amendment prevents the Interior Department from taking any action that would dispose of the Tribe's land and reservation. It would also protect the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe from continuing litigation and recognize their tribal lands without interference from the...

  • First Nations pivots funding to support Native youth-serving organizations through the pandemic

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    LONGMONT, Colo.-First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) announced in July that 23 organizations and tribal programs will receive grants of up to $18,250 to continue to serve their youth and communities during the coronavirus pandemic. The grants are being awarded through First Nations' Native Youth and Culture Fund (NYCF), which invests in projects that focus on youth and incorporate culture and tradition to address social issues such as drug and alcohol abuse,...

  • New Mexico tribe opens movie studio

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    TESUQUE PUEBLO, N.M.—The Tesuque Pueblo Tribe, a small northern New Mexico Native American tribe, has opened Camel Rock Studios near Santa Fe, New Mexico. The studio is designed to offer location for external or internal filming. Outside, the studios feature 27 square miles of tribal land including stunning desert and the iconic Camel Rock formation in the red-brown foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Inside filming can take place in a former casino that the tribe h...

  • Indigenous children's show wins Peabody Award

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    ATHENS, Ga.-The children's PBS program "Molly of Denali" has been awarded with a prestigious Peabody Award. "Molly of Denali" was the first nationally distributed children's series to feature an Indigenous girl living in Alaska as the lead character and won the award in the children's and youth division. The series is a co-production with CBC Kids. The show focuses on the cartoon character Molly Mabray, an Indigenous girl living in Alaska of Gwich'in, Koyukon, Dena'ina, and...

  • Native nursing students to receive full scholarships

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    BOZEMAN, Mont.-American Indian and Alaska Native students in the Montana State University College of Nursing will have more opportunities to earn scholarships thanks to a new $2.5 million grant. The funding will be used for Montana Advantage Nursing Scholarships, which aim to keep American Indian and Alaska Native students in school and increase their graduation rates. The grant, from the Health Resources and Services Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human...

  • University introduces ground-breaking policy involving Indigenous studies

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    ST. JOHN'S, NL-Memorial University has brought in a new policy-which school officials believe is the first of its kind in Canada-requiring any research involving Indigenous people to get their stamp of approval before going ahead. At its July 9 meeting, the Board of Regents for Memorial University in Newfoundland approved the Research Impacting Indigenous Groups policy, the first of its kind known in Canadian universities. The policy will provide more effective, sensitive and...

  • New documentary features Blackfeet women

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    Blackfeet Nation-ESPN Films has produced a new documentary focusing on Native American women called "Blackfeet Boxing: Not Invisible." Directed by Kristen Lappas and Tom Rinaldi, "Blackfeet Boxing: Not Invisible" documents the story of the Blackfeet Nation Boxing Club, opened in 2003 by Frank Kipp, a third generation boxer of Blackfeet descent and a former welterweight. The saying is common on reservations across America: A Native American woman who disappears goes missing...

  • Oilers player honors Indigenous heritage

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    EDMONTON, AB-Oilers defenceman Ethan Bear honored his Indigenous heritage during the July 28 Battle of Alberta exhibition game by displaying his jersey name bar in Cree syllabics. The 23-year-old from Ochapowace Nation in southern Saskatchewan said he was donning the name bar proudly on behalf of all past, present and future Indigenous hockey players. It was an honor to wear the jersey, Bear said. "I feel like I will be wearing it for all those Indigenous players who came...

  • Native American groups address mental and behavioral health as COVID-19 wears on

    Deagan Urbatsch and Jacqueline Robledo, Cronkite News|Updated Aug 6, 2020

    PHOENIX-With COVID-19 taking an especially heavy toll on Native Americans, tribal leaders and mental health experts have stepped up efforts to address the emotional suffering brought on by ongoing lockdowns and so much loss. "Please stay connected with relatives and neighbors by phone or video chat and remind them that they have support," Navajo Nation Vice President Myron Lizer said recently, imploring Navajos to take care of their mental well-being as well as their physical...

  • Power to Conquer Pain and Suffering

    Rhoda Kakegamic|Updated Aug 6, 2020

    May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in Him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit. -Romans 15:13 NIV Each of us is on a journey. It starts with the birth of a newborn baby and ends when that life is finished according to the will of God who gives us life. Along this journey, we all face different situations and yet we all face many of the same things. For instance, almost all of us have families, though our families...

  • The Council Speaks

    Craig Stephen Smith and Dr. Randy Jackson|Updated Aug 6, 2020

    Q: With marijuana now being legalized in many areas of Canada and USA, is it okay to use it? I'm told it has many medicinal properties. A: History tells us that culture is ever changing, adjusting itself to the whims and wishes of the day. John Wesley was credited with saying, "What one generation tolerates, the next generation will embrace." Such is true of the issue of the legalization of marijuana in our present culture. As always, the believer in Christ needs to evaluate...

  • An Open Door for Positive Influence

    Kene Jackson NEFC Executive Director|Updated Aug 6, 2020

    I remember Chris, a divorced single mom who'd recently lost her IT job. She was struggling to find her way in life, as well as to make a living for herself and her daughter. She was a believer, but that was often a struggle too. After an afternoon of helping her move to another apartment, we struck up a conversation about some life issues. The topic of foster parenting came up. I asked if she had ever considered becoming a foster parent. She responded with a resounding, "No...

  • Trump administration establishes the first cold case task force office for missing and murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    BLOOMINGTON, Minn.-In late July, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt, Advisor to the President Ivanka Trump and Assistant Secretary - Indian Affairs Tara Katuk Sweeney established the first of seven offices dedicated to solving cold cases involving missing and murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives. The first office is located in Bloomington, Minn. According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's National Crime Information Center, there are more than...

  • Indigenous-owned enterprises adept at breaking into foreign markets

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    TORONTO, Ont.-Indigenous-owned small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are showing that they are highly adept at breaking into foreign markets, according to a new report jointly released by the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB) and the Office of the Chief Economist of Global Affairs Canada (OCE-GAC). The report, Indigenous-Owned Exporting SMEs in Canada, finds that, based on CCAB survey data, nearly a quarter (24%) of Indigenous SMEs operating in Canada...

  • As deadline looms, Congress urged to reauthorize diabetes program for Native Americans

    Deagan Urbatsch, Cronkite News|Updated Aug 6, 2020

    PHOENIX-Arizona's U.S. senators are pushing legislation to renew a federal program that fights diabetes in Indian Country-an initiative tribal leaders say is vital amid the COVID-19 pandemic. "The Special Diabetes Program for Indians is critical in our fight against diabetes and viruses such as COVID-19," Navajo President Jonathan Nez said in a statement. "If we want our people to be stronger and able to prevent and fight off viruses, then we need our people to eat healthy...

  • Cherokee Nation removes Confederate monuments from historic Capitol Square

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    TAHLEQUAH, Okla.-Two Confederate monuments were lifted by crane and removed from the Cherokee Nation Capitol Square in Tahlequah Saturday as directed by Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin, Jr., who observed from a few feet away. Both monuments were placed on the capitol square nearly a century ago when the property was a county courthouse owned by the state. The Cherokee Nation did not place the monuments. "We've suffered for centuries with too many others telling our story for us...

  • Canadian First Nations radio station brings light to North American audience

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    PICKLE LAKE, Ont.-CJTL (Christ Jesus the Light) Radio was started in Ontario, Canada in 2005, when an alliance was formed between a group of First Nation believers and Nations One For Christ, a US-based organization headed by Frank Drown. CJTL is licensed under the Native Evangelical Fellowship of Canada (NEFC) and governed by an all-Native Board of Directors. CJTL "The Light" went on the air in October 2007 from its studios in Pickle Lake, Ontario, and with a repeater in...

  • Washington football team retires controversial name

    Updated Aug 6, 2020

    Washington, DC-On July 13, the Washington National Football League team retired their infamous team name: The Washington Redskins. The interim name for the 2020 season, while they choose a new moniker and logo, is the Washington Football Team. The Redskins name first came to be in 1933 when co-owner George Preston Marshall changed the name from the Braves to the Redskins while the team was sharing a playing field with the Boston Braves baseball team. Some sources say he...

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