Books


Sorted by date  Results 1 - 25 of 45

  • Book award rescinded for romanticizing genocide

    Updated Jun 23, 2022

    Houston, Tex.-When the Romance Writers of America announced their 2021 awards, the book At Love's Command by Karen Witemeyer, was presented as the best romance with religious or spiritual elements of 2021, as part of the inaugural Vivan Awards. However, the judges determining the award were soon criticized for insensitivities to Native Americans. The book opens with a scene depicting the Wounded Knee Massacre, and critics feel it romanticized the killing of Native Americans....

  • Visiting the Father

    Updated Nov 22, 2021

    I wanted to have a better relationship with God. So, I started using my imagination because scripture tells us to think of those things which are above. I imagined myself going before the gates of Heaven and knocking. The gates opened and I went through them with thanksgiving, as Psalm 100 says, and through His courts with praise. Then, after that, I would run into the throne room and go and sit on the Father's lap. The first time I sat and stroked his beard and then I kissed...

  • Beyond the Sixties Scoop Takes Reader on Journey of Healing

    Parry Stelter|Updated Sep 2, 2021

    When you read Beyond the Sixties Scoop by Deborah Ironstand you'll be taken on a journey of brokenness, healing, and resiliency. Deborah writes about childhood memories of living off the land with her mother, grandma, and grandpa in a traditional Anishinaabe and Ojibway household. Then came the foster care system. With her mother experiencing the Residential School System and Deborah being from what has been called the Sixties Scoop generation, life was hard. Although she had...

  • Chickasaw publications receive awards, recognition

    Updated Jun 15, 2020

    ADA, Okla.-Two Chickasaw Press publications recently received recognition at the state and national level. The graphic novel Chickasaw Adventures: The Complete Collection was honored by two national organizations of independent publishers. Protecting Our People, written by Michelle Cooke, received a statewide award for its design and national recognition as historical fiction. "It is a great honor to be recognized in the book industry for all the hard work of the authors, illu...

  • New book accurately details Cherokee history

    Bill John Baker|Updated Sep 10, 2018

    Three men I deeply admire-the late Dr. Duane King, Dr. Neil Morton and Dr. Bob Blackburn -collaborated to write an engaging new history book called, Cherokee Nation: A History of Survival, Self Determination and Identity. It is the first book of its kind to have the full support of the Cherokee Nation and the first historic narrative of the tribe that we have self-published. Cherokees persevere because our values and traditions are deeply rooted in us. They have enabled us to...

  • DreamTrek: Journey Through the Night's Door

    Updated Nov 16, 2017

    Paperback available through Amazon A woman becomes torn between her husband and a man from her past as she uncovers a dangerous scheme in this third installment of a series. After a tumultuous adolescence, Dina Youngblood, a striking Seminole/Cherokee beauty, is married to evangelist Aaron Burning Rain. They reside in the Bitterroot Confederacy of Indians, coexisting with colorful neighbors ("A male alligator-halpatee, in what Uncle Donnie called 'Seminole talk'-sounded his...

  • Birth of the Chosen One

    Retold by Terry M.Wildman, Illustrated by Ramone Romero|Updated Nov 16, 2017

    Dream Guidance Bitter Tears had returned home to be with her family and to He Gives Sons, the man she was promised to in marriage. Before they came together he discovered that she was with child. Because he was a man of honor and did not want to disgrace her, he thought about secretly releasing her from the marriage promise. As he wondered about these things, a messenger from the Great Spirit appeared to him in a dream, and said, "He Gives Sons, son of Much Loved One, do not...

  • Worth Reading

    Review by Carla McKay|Updated Jul 15, 2017

    Book Review: Firewater How Alcohol is Killing My People (and Yours) by Harold R. Johnson University of Regina 180 pages Trade Paper Firewater is a tough read. What Harold Johnson writes is the hard truth about the devastating impact alcohol has had on our Indigenous peoples. Johnson, from the Montreal Lake Cree Nation, was a prosecuting attorney. He writes about tribal traditions, spirituality, and modern medical research to take on the stereotype of "lazy drunken Indian."...

  • Richard Wagamese: "a national treasure gone too soon."

    Updated May 12, 2017

    KAMLOOPS, BC-Author and journalist Richard Wagamese died in Kamloops, British Columbia on March 9. His death came just one week after he was nominated for a B.C. Book Prize for Embers: One Ojibway's Meditations. The author of several non-fiction and fiction books, Wagamese is perhaps best known for Indian Horse, the story of a residential school student who finds his escape through his love of hockey. The book was a finalist in CBC's Canada Reads 2013 contest and is going to...

  • Indigenous writers and books win big at Manitoba Book Awards

    Updated May 12, 2017

    WINNIPEG, MB-The writing community gathered at the historic Fort Garry Hotel in downtown Winnipeg on April 22, to celebrate writing and honor excellence among its writers and artists. This year Indigenous authors and illustrators won many of the awards. Among them was Katerena Vermette who was the big winner of the night. She won the Carol Shields Winnipeg Book Award and the Margaret Laurence Award for Fiction and the McNally Robinson Book of the Year Award for her novel The...

  • Worth Reading

    Updated May 12, 2017

    Book Review: Osage murders explored in Killers of Flower Moon Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by writer David Grann details the murders of dozens-if not hundreds-of Osage Nation citizens who were targeted because of their oil royalty payments. New York Times literary critic Dwight Garner offers a review: Killers of the Flower Moon describes how the Osage people were driven from their lands in Kansas onto a rocky portion of northwestern...

  • An Ojibwe elder shares his discovery of help and hope

    Updated Mar 13, 2017

    The Grieving Indian by Arthur Holmes with George McPeek Indian Life Books, Paper Review by Dr. Robert R. Dawson The Grieving Indian is a gripping story which accents the problems Native Americans face. The Ojibwe have the most severe problems because they were a small group and not granted a reservation. They were left to shift more or less on their own. After much neglect and mistreatment as children and teenagers, struggling with alcoholism for many years, as adults were...

  • The Reason You Walk

    Review by Carla McKay|Updated Jan 9, 2017

    Most Canadians have heard of Wab Kinew either from his reporting on CBC, as host of the 8th Fire documentary series or his involvement with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. However, reading Wab's memoir, you will discover the key to his success as a communicator, educator, and now politician. The Reason You Walk is an interesting read. It provoked many emotions like anger, sadness and happiness. This book involved hope, healing, and forgiveness. It is a poignant story...

  • Indigenous voices from across Canada

    Updated Nov 14, 2016

    First Nations Christian Writers- Volume 1 Anthology Edited by Dorene Meyer ISBN: 978-1-927410-31-8 Goldrock Press Paper 82 pages $9.95 Sixteen writers from large cities, isolated northern communities, high school and university campuses contributed essays that are eye-opening and heart-breaking but also full of hope. Joshua Heath, 14, writes of the horrific effects of being a ward of the foster care system and how it has shaped his life (see his story on page 9). Brenda...

  • A fast-paced murder mystery

    Review by Carla McKay|Updated Sep 9, 2016

    By James R. Coggins Moody Publishers Paperback If you like mysteries and suspense thrillers, you'll love Who's Grace? by James G. Coggins. It's a fast paced murder mystery with a twist. John Smyth, a magazine editor witnesses a murder through the window of his jet as it descends for a landing in Winnipeg, Canada. Neither the city police nor the RCMP (Mounties) believe him until a woman's unidentified body is found in nearby woods two weeks later. The only clue to who she is...

  • It all began in a little northern town

    Rita Holmgren Anderson|Updated May 14, 2016

    Indian Life Books 150 pages Trade paper Review by Carla McKay This is the story of a young girl living in a remote northern Saskatchewan Cree community. As a child she realized that there are two roads in life. One road is wide and well travelled and the other is narrow and sparsely travelled. She determined she wanted to walk along the path less travelled. The one that led to hope and a forever future. Life was not easy for Rita and her family. There were many difficulties...

  • A Native American Worldview

    Richard L. Twiss|Updated May 14, 2016

    IVP, Downers Grove, Illinois 2015 Review by John D Wilson I finished reading this short but challenging book while on a ministry trip in Papua. Here is why Rescuing the Gospel struck me as significant, but also a challenge to read. Canadians and Americans perhaps will feel this as it focuses mainly on the American colonization of North America with some allusions to the Canadian context. It gives a sketch of the history of the Native American encounter with the expanding...

  • BETTY: The Helen Betty Osborne Story

    Review by Carla McKay|Updated Mar 24, 2016

    David Alexander Robertson Illustrated by Scott B. Henderson Highwater Press, Paper, 30 pages Ever since Tina Fontaine's brutally murdered body was pulled from the Red River in Winnipeg, the cry for all the missing and murdered Indigenous women has become louder and louder. And it should. Finally, the Canadian government is paying serious attention to these thousands of families who have lost loved ones and friends. One such story that got some attention back in the 1970s was...

  • Worth Reading

    Review by Carla McKay|Updated Jan 16, 2016

    by Jane Kirkpatrick Revell, Baker Publishing Group Softcover 320 pages This is the story of three women-Letitia, a freed slave, Nancy, who leaves the life she loves to follow her husband to the West Coast, and Betsy, a Kalapuya Indian, the last remnant of the proud tribe in the Willamette Valley. I like this book because it tells the incredible story of these three women who went through life on a treacherous west-bound journey by wagon train. This is based on a true story....

  • A courageous young girl brings help and hope in time of crisis

    Updated Nov 14, 2015

    The Fire Walker by Shezza Ansloos Illustrator Sheldon Dawson Pemmican Publications, 2014 ISBN: 1894717937; 9781894717939 "The wind rocked the little village long ago, blowing out every fire and leaving the people with no way to cook their food or keep warm. All they could do was hope for the arrival of the legendary Fire Walker to bring heat and light back to them." So begins a unique story about a young Native child who discovers inspiration and courage in a time of crisis...

  • 100+ Native American Women Who Changed the World

    Review by Carla McKay|Updated Nov 14, 2015

    The Peppertree Press Trade Paper 213 pages by K.B. Schaller Cherokee/Seminole National Best Books Award-winning author K.B. Schaller has compiled an extensive collection of biographies of more than 100 Native American women who have accomplished much and thus changed the world by changing their world. 100+ Native American Women Who Changed the World is well-researched. As LaDonna Harris, Comanche, founder and president of Americans for Indian Opportunity says that this book...

  • The Inconvenient Indian

    Thomas King|Updated Sep 10, 2015

    Anchor Canada Trade Paper 314 pages Review by Carla McKay Whether you are Native or non-Native, you need to read this book. If you do so, you will have a totally different perspective about Native people in North America. This story needed to be told and there's no one better to tell it than award-winning and best-selling author, Thomas King. This book is not only a retelling of the historical account that most of us, both Native and Caucasian, learned in history class. It's...

  • Rez in the City

    Updated Sep 10, 2015

    I finally broke my silence and good news I have been holding in for a couple of months. I entered an options agreement with a screenwriter from Hollywood to develop my book into a TV series. At this point, I have handed my baby over to the care of another. If this works out, I will be hired as one of the writers on the show, which we are hoping is a half hour series containing heavy issues and not forgetting the comedy. I must admit, while it is a step forward and basically on...

  • Neal McLeod wins Gabrielle Roy Prize

    Updated Aug 1, 2015

    WATERLOO, ON-WLU Press author Neal McLeod has won the 2014 Gabrielle Roy Prize (English section) for his edited collection, Indigenous Poetics in Canada. In addition, Larissa Lai, also a WLU Press author, was one of four finalists for the prize with her book, Slanting I, Imagining We: Asian Canadian Literary Production in the 1980s and 1990s. The Association of Canadian and Quebec Literature awarded the prize at a reception May 30 in Ottawa. "We're very pleased by this...

  • Champlin couple create fund to support Native students at BS

    Updated Aug 1, 2015

    BEMIDJI, MN—A gift by retired biology teachers Dr. Darby and Geri Nelson to Bemidji State University’s Imagine Tomorrow campaign is intended to help American Indian students overcome financial obstacles, the BSU Foundation announced. Awards of $100 to $750 will be made from the new Helping Hands (Naadamaageng) Student Assistance Fund to enable native students to overcome a short-term money crunch that might otherwise force them to drop out. The Nelsons, who live in Champlin, said they are extending their wide-ranging phi...

Page Down

Rendered 06/13/2024 06:57